DAYLIGHT SAVINGS: HOW TO FALL BACK BUT STAY AHEAD  

Humans have the power to manipulate time. In fact, you do it every fall and spring when you set your clock back or forward an hour for daylight saving time (DST). But why did we start doing it and how can you make the biannual time change go more smoothly? Read on to learn more about daylight savings and how to prepare.

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS AND SLEEP

While it’s only an hour time change, it can take some people up to a week to reset their internal clock. To get back to normal, fast, here are four things you can do.
 

Prepare for the change.
In the fall, you gain an hour of sleep, which means you can get away with staying up an hour later. If staying up late is difficult for you, try staying up a little later each night leading up to the time change.
 

Soak up the sunlight.
Fall marks the beginning of shorter and darker days, so be sure to get plenty of light in the morning and throughout the day to keep your circadian rhythm and sleep schedule on track.
 

Rethink your nightly routine.
Daylight savings is the perfect time to reset your nighttime routine.  For starters: Limit your caffeine and alcohol intake and don’t workout too close to bedtime. This will help you fall asleep more easily.

 

Get your pets on your schedule.
Your pet’s internal clock will be just as out of sync as yours. So rather than get upset when your furry friend wakes you up early, ease your pet into the time change the same way you’re getting yourself ready.

     

THE ORIGIN OF DAYLIGHT SAVINGS

Benjamin Franklin first came up with the idea in 1784 while in Paris. One night he was at the home of two Frenchmen admiring a new lamp that, while beautiful, consumed too much oil for the amount of light it gave off.  That night, he went to bed late (a few hours after midnight) but woke up shortly after and saw that sunlight filled his bedroom.

I went home, and to bed, three or four hours after midnight… An accidental sudden noise waked me about six in the morning, when I was surprised to find my room filled with light—and I imagined at first that a number of those lamps had been brought into it. But, rubbing my eyes, I perceived the light came in at the windows. I got up and looked out to see what might be the occasion of it, when I saw the sun just rising above the horizon…

— Benjamin Franklin, 1784

He thought: why waste candles at night when we can just wake up earlier? In 1918, the United States turned Franklin’s proposal into a federal law as part of a wartime conservation effort. Later, the law became permanent by the Uniform Time Act (1966) and the Energy Policy Act (2005).

      

Fun Fact:
In the U.S., all states observe daylight savings EXCEPT Hawaii and most of Arizona. In Arizona, only the Navajo Nation (a large reservation in northeast Arizona) is on DST.

 
 

Did you know…
It’s a common misconception that DST ordinance was enacted to benefit farmers. In fact, farmers fought the hardest to repeal it. For them, one less hour of morning light means less time to get their crops to market. For dairy farmers, it means getting their cows on a new milking schedule.

     

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS:
HOW TO FALL BACK BUT
STAY AHEAD
 

Humans have the power to manipulate time. In fact, you do it every fall and spring when you set your clock back or forward an hour for daylight saving time (DST). But why did we start doing it and how can you make the biannual time change go more smoothly? Read on to learn more about daylight savings and how to prepare.

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS AND SLEEP

While it’s only an hour time change, it can take some people up to a week to reset their internal clock. To get back to normal, fast, here are four things you can do.

Prepare for the change.
In the fall, you gain an hour of sleep, which means you can get away with staying up an hour later. If staying up late is difficult for you, try staying up a little later each night leading up to the time change.

Soak up the sunlight.
Fall marks the beginning of shorter and darker days, so be sure to get plenty of light in the morning and throughout the day to keep your circadian rhythm and sleep schedule on track.

Rethink your nightly routine.
Daylight savings is the perfect time to reset your nighttime routine.  For starters: Limit your caffeine and alcohol intake and don’t workout too close to bedtime. This will help you fall asleep more easily.

Get your pets on your schedule.
Your pet’s internal clock will be just as out of sync as yours. So rather than get upset when your furry friend wakes you up early, ease your pet into the time change the same way you’re getting yourself ready.

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS AND SLEEP

Benjamin Franklin first came up with the idea in 1784 while in Paris. One night he was at the home of two Frenchmen admiring a new lamp that, while beautiful, consumed too much oil for the amount of light it gave off.  That night, he went to bed late (a few hours after midnight) but woke up shortly after and saw that sunlight filled his bedroom.

He thought: why waste candles at night when
we can just wake up earlier? In 1918, the United
States turned Franklin’s proposal into a federal
law as part of a wartime conservation effort.
Later, the law became permanent by the
Uniform Time Act (1966) and the
Energy Policy Act (2005).

Fun Fact:
In the U.S., all states observe daylight savings EXCEPT Hawaii and most of Arizona. In Arizona, only the Navajo Nation (a large reservation in northeast Arizona) is on DST.

Did you know…
It’s a common misconception that DST ordinance was enacted to benefit farmers. In fact, farmers fought the hardest to repeal it. For them, one less hour of morning light means less time to get their crops to market. For dairy farmers, it means getting their cows on a new milking schedule.